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ISNAP Seminars - Abstracts 2014 Fall


Topic: The reactions 12C(α,γ)16O and 12C+12C in direct experiments – Present status and perspectives

Dr. Frank Strieder ( Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany ) / August 18, 2014

The capture reactions 12C(α,γ)16O takes place in the helium burning of Red Giants and the 12C+12C fusion reactions are the main processes in carbon burning of massive stars. These reactions determine not only the nucleosynthesis of elements up to the iron region but also the subsequent evolution of massive stars, the dynamics of a supernova, and the kind of remnant after a supernova explosion. For these reasons, the cross section at the relevant astrophysical energy should be known with a precision of at least 10% for reliable models of late stellar evolution.
In spite of tremendous experimental efforts in measuring this cross section over nearly 40 years, one is still far from this goal. The available experimental data of these two important nuclear processes will be reviewed and open problems, questions, and ambiguities will be discussed. Finally, the prospects for new experiments will be outlined, with particular emphasis on the potentials and challenges of measurements at a future underground accelerator facility.


Topic: Fundamental Symmetries and Quantum Chaos

Prof. Vladimir Zelevinsky ( NSCL, Michigan State University ) / September 8, 2014

The statement that the atomic nucleus is a natural laboratory for studying fundamental symmetries became a common place. It is especially important now when nuclear physics enters a new period of tempestuous development with new ideas and new powerful facilities. In the talk I will discuss two examples - parity non-conservation and the search for the electric dipole moment violating both parity and time-reversal invariance - from the viewpoint of nuclear many-body mechanisms which can enhance those effects. In the first example the main role is played by many-body quantum chaos which is confirmed by experiments (the ideas of quantum chaos will be briefly explained along the road). In the second example, we have no data but just ideas of promising nuclear structure mechanisms of considerable enhancement.


Topic: TBA

Prof. Mathew Redshaw ( Central Michigan University ) / September 15, 2014



Topic: Special Nuclear Seminar

Dr. Bruce Remington ( Lawrence Livermore National Lab ) / September 23, 2014



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Topic: TBA

Dr. Paul Schaffer ( TRIUMF, Canada ) / September 29, 2014



Topic: TBA

Prof. Graham Peaslee ( Hope College, MI ) / November 3, 2014



Topic: TBA

Dr. Daniel Bemmerer ( Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Germany ) / November 10, 2014



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Topic: TBA

Dr. Alain Lapierre ( NSCL, Michigan State University ) / November 17, 2014



Topic: TBA

Prof. Con Beausang ( University of Richmond, VA ) / December 8, 2014



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